Exhibition Devoted to Guggenheim Collection to Open in Bonn, Germany

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Most Comprehensive Exhibition Ever Devoted to Guggenheim Collection to Open in Bonn, Germany

 

First Show Devoted to the Guggenheim Foundation’s Architectural Commissions Also on View


• The Guggenheim Collection—July 21, 2006–January 7, 2007

• The Guggenheim: Architecture—August 25–November 12, 2006


(NEW YORK, NY – July 20, 2006) From July 21, 2006, through January 7, 2007, The Guggenheim Collection, an exhibition of masterworks from the Guggenheim’s network of museums in New York, Venice, Berlin, and Bilbao, will be presented simultaneous at the Kunst-und Austellungshalle (KAH) and the Kunstmuseum Bonn (KMB) in Bonn, Germany. Comprising approximately 200 works from Impressionism and classic modernism to the present, The Guggenheim Collection is the most comprehensive exhibition to date from the Guggenheim’s extended collection. The exhibition has been co-organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, and the Kunst-und Austellungshalle (KAH), Bonn. The exhibition is sponsored by Deutsche Telekom.


A second exhibition, The Guggenheim: Architecture, is also being held at the Kunst-und Austellungshalle, from August 25–November 12, 2006. Conceived by Peter Noever, Director, Museum für Angewandte Kunst, Vienna, The Guggenheim: Architecture is the first survey of architectural commissions and design competitions for the Guggenheim. The exhibition will include 25 projects by 15 architects who have designed both built and unrealized projects for the Guggenheim Foundation, from Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterpiece in New York City and Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim in Bilbao, Spain, to a number of projects that have been developed for proposed museums in Salzburg, Vienna, Tokyo, Taichung, Rio de Janeiro, and Guadalajara.


The Guggenheim Collection, July 21, 2006–January 7, 2007

The Guggenheim Collection is part of a highly successful series of exhibitions organized by the KAH (http://www.kah-bonn.de) that focus on masterworks from the permanent collections of the great museums of the world. Past exhibitions have included selections from the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.


The Guggenheim Collection will mirror the institution’s history by presenting a selection of masterworks that reflect the major art historical movements, from the late 19th century to the present, and by emphasizing those artists who are particularly well represented in the collection, among them Vasily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Pablo Picasso, Constantin Brancusi, Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg, and Richard Serra.


The galleries unfold chronologically from Impressionism to contemporary art, highlighting Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, Cubism (including a gallery dedicated to Picasso’s paintings, among them the masterwork The Studio), Orphism, Neo-Plasticism, Neo-Primitivism, German Expressionism, Constructivism, Surrealism, postwar figurative painting of the 1950s and 1960s, Abstract Expressionism, Robert Rauschenberg, Pop Art, Minimalism (the Panza Collection), and art after 1990, including video, installation, and photography. Due to the large-scale size of the these works, this final section will be shown at the KMB.


This exhibition will also include a sizeable, multi-faceted, and vivid historical section consisting of texts, select artworks, and photographic, archival, and multi-media materials that tell the story of the founding and development of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation’s global museum network and their collections. This section will further elucidate the personal visions of the great collectors and directors who shaped the museum’s history, as well as their impact on the history of art and museums. Defining exhibitions and artists whose work has been collected in depth by the Guggenheim will also be examined. And the evolution of the various branches of the Foundation will be presented in this section: the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice; the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Bilbao; and Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin.


The Guggenheim Collection is organized by a team of curators from both institutions: Thomas Krens, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation; Valerie Hillings, Assistant Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; and KAH project leaders Kay Heymer and Susanne Kleine.


Both the artistic and institutional histories represented by the Guggenheim’s collection will be told in the fully-illustrated catalogue, available in both German and English, which will include ten scholarly essays and an illustrated chronology. It will be published by the Guggenheim Museum and distributed in Germany by Hatje Cantz Verlag.


In the last fifteen years, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation has organized several presentations from its classical collections in Europe and Asia. In 1990–91 Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Museum traveled to Salzburg, Venice, Madrid, Tokyo, and Sydney; and in 1996, another exhibition of masterpieces from the Guggenheim Museum traveled to Korea, Singapore, New Zealand, Shanghai, and Taiwan. In 2005 Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection was presented in Rome at the Scuderie del Quirinale.


The Guggenheim: Architecture, August 25–November 12, 2006

The Guggenheim: Architecture presents a comprehensive review of built and unbuilt projects that have been commissioned by the Guggenheim since its inception in 1939. Architects whose designs are featured in the exhibition include: Asymptote, Shiguru Ban, Frank Gehry, Richard Gluckman, Vittorio Gregotti, Charles Gwathmey, Coop Himmelblau, Hans Holbein, Arata Isozaki, Rem Koolhaas, Enrique Norten, Jean Nouvel, Clemente de Thiene, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Zaha Hadid. This exhibition will examine the ways in which existing and imagined spaces have played a complex and central role in the Guggenheim’s history. The exhibition will feature plans, drawings, and models, and will include loans from the architects’ studios and private collections.


More than any other single event, the extraordinary design by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum on Fifth Avenue in New York (which was constructed in the 1950s and opened in 1959) defined the Guggenheim in terms of architecture, and branded the name and unique character of the Guggenheim in the popular mind. Forty years later, the Guggenheim opened a second, architecturally distinct and sophisticated museum—the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao—which may have had an even greater impact on the popular imagination.


The exterior image of these buildings has a distinct interaction with the strategies of collecting and display that are part of the Guggenheim. Perhaps more importantly, the interior architecture of the Guggenheim museums—with both their advantages and limitations—have inspired debate about the future of museums, the future of collections, and the relevance of these institutions in an increasingly interconnected world.


The exhibition will include 25 projects by 15 architects who have designed both built and unrealized projects for the Guggenheim Foundation, from Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterpiece in New York City and Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim in Bilbao, Spain, to a number of projects that have been developed for proposed museums in Salzburg, Vienna, Tokyo, Taichung, Rio de Janeiro, and Guadalajara.


The Guggenheim: Architecture was conceived Peter Noever, Exhibition Curator / Director MAK Vienna (Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art). The exhibition was co-organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and the Kunst-und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Bonn.


#1036
July 20, 2006

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
Betsy Ennis
Guggenheim Public Affairs
212-423-3840
E-mail: publicaffairs@guggenheim.org
www.guggenheim.org


For publicity images go to http://www.kah-bonn.de