Hugo Boss Prize 2006: Shortlist

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HUGO BOSS PRIZE 2006: Shortlist

 

MIAMI, FL, December 2, 2005 — Thomas Krens, Director, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, Lisa Dennison, Director, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and Bruno Saelzer, Chairman and CEO, HUGO BOSS AG, today announced the shortlist for the HUGO BOSS PRIZE 2006 at a reception hosted by HUGO BOSS at Art Basel in Miami. The HUGO BOSS PRIZE finalists for 2006 include:


• Jennifer Allora (US) & Guillermo Calzadilla (Puerto Rico) — installation, sculpture, photo, video
• John Bock (Germany) — performance, installation, film
• Tacita Dean (UK) — film, video, drawing
• Damián Ortega (Mexico) — sculpture, installation
• Aïda Ruilova (US) — video
• Tino Sehgal (Germany) — situations


A publication featuring the work of all six finalists with accompanying essays will be published in June 2006. The winner of the HUGO BOSS PRIZE 2006 will be selected and announced in fall 2006, followed by an exhibition of the prize-winning artist’s work to be presented in early 2007 at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.


“It has been over a decade since the Guggenheim entered into this collaboration with HUGO BOSS to administer the prize that bears its name,” said Lisa Dennison. “Since its inception, the HUGO BOSS PRIZE has become one of the premier juried prizes of the contemporary art world. Perhaps its greatest reward is giving the Guggenheim the opportunity to identify, exhibit, collect, and honor the work of extraordinarily talented artists who are actively redefining cultural and intellectual boundaries around the world. It gives me great pleasure to announce the artists nominated for the shortlist for HUGO BOSS PRIZE 2006.”


“We are delighted that the HUGO BOSS PRIZE is now celebrating its tenth anniversary,” said Dr. Bruno Saelzer, CEO and Chairman of HUGO BOSS AG. “This demonstrates how firmly the award has become anchored in the contemporary art world and also underscores our continuing commitment to the arts.”


The biennial HUGO BOSS PRIZE is administered by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and is juried by a distinguished international panel of museum directors, curators, and critics. According to the HUGO BOSS PRIZE criteria, the award is given to an artist whose work represents a significant development in contemporary art. The prize sets no restrictions in terms of age, gender, race, nationality, or media, and the nominations may include young, emerging artists as well as established individuals whose public recognition may be long overdue. The prize carries with it an award of $50,000.


The jurors of the HUGO BOSS PRIZE 2006 are: Jennifer Blessing, Project Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Lisa Dennison, Director, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Silvia Karman Cubiñá, Director, The Moore Space, Miami; Massimiliano Gioni, Artistic Director, Fondazione Nicola Trussardi, Milan, and co-curator of the 4th Berlin Biennial (March 2006); Vicente Todoli, Director, Tate Modern, London; and Maria-Christina Villaseñor, Associate Curator of Film and Media Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.


This marks the tenth year since the inception in 1996 of the biennial HUGO BOSS PRIZE. Since then five artists have been awarded the prize, including: American artist Matthew Barney (1996); Scottish artist Douglas Gordon (1998); Slovenian artist Marjetica Potr? (2000); French artist Pierre Huyghe (2002); and Thai artist Rirkrit Tiravanija (2004). The list of finalists in previous years includes: Laurie Anderson, Janine Antoni, Stan Douglas, Cai Guo Qiang, and Yasumasa Morimura in 1996; Huang Yong Ping, William Kentridge, Lee Bul, Pipilotti Rist, and Lorna Simpson in 1998; Vito Acconci, Maurizio Cattelan, Michael Elmgreen & Ingar Dragset, Tom Friedman, Barry Le Va, and Tunga in 2000; Francis Alÿs, Olafur Eliasson, Hachiya Kazuhiko, Koo Jeong-a, and Anri Sala in 2002; and Franz Ackermann, Rivane Neuenschwander, Jeroen de Rijke and Willem de Rooij, Simon Starling, and Yang Fudong in 2004.


HUGO BOSS has provided critical support to many of the Guggenheim Museum’s programs since 1995. In addition to the HUGO BOSS PRIZE, the company has helped to make possible retrospectives of the work of Matthew Barney, Georg Baselitz, Ross Bleckner, Francesco Clemente, Ellsworth Kelly, Robert Rauschenberg, and James Rosenquist.


Profiles of HUGO BOSS PRIZE 2006 Short-Listed Artists


Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla
Jennifer Allora (b. 1974, Philadelphia) and Guillermo Calzadilla (b. 1972, Havana, Cuba) have collaborated since 1995. Based in Puerto Rico, Allora and Calzadilla create subversively poetic conceptual art that explores the complicated relationship between globalization and the private sphere.


Solo exhibitions of their work include Allora & Calzadilla, Institute of Visual Arts (INOVA) at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (2002); Puerto Rican Light, The Americas Society Art Gallery, New York (2003); Radio Revolt: One Person, One Watt, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2004); and Chalk, The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (2004).


Their work has been featured in numerous group exhibitions including XXIV Biennal de São Paulo, São Paulo (1998); VII Bienal de la Habana, Havana (2000); Ill Bienal Iberoamericana, Lima (2002); Interplay, The Moore Space, Miami (2002); How Latitudes Become Forms: Art in a Global Age, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2003); Away From Home, The Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio (2003); Common Wealth, Tate Modern, London (2003); Only Skin Deep: Changing Visions of the American Self, International Center of Photography, New York (2003); Gwangju Biennale, Gwangju, South Korea (2004); Son et Lumiere, MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts (2004); Ailleurs, Ici, ARC-Musée d’art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Couvent des Cordeliers, Paris (2004); Dakar Biennale: Le Monde: Dak’Art 2004, Dakar, Senegal (2004); Experiencing Duration, Lyon Biennale of Contemporary Art(2005); Always a Little Further, 51st International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale (2005); 1st Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art, Former Lenin Museum, Moscow (2005); inSITE_05, The Airport Bar, San Diego–Tijuana (2005); and Tropical Abstraction, Stedelijk Museum Bureau, Amsterdam (2005).


In 2004, they received the Korea Foundation Award at the Gwangju Biennale for their video Returning a Sound and the Civitella Ranieri Fellowship, Umbertide. They have also been awarded residencies at P.S.1 Contemporary Arts Center, Long Island City, New York (1998–99), Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2003-04) and the Headlands Center for the Arts, Sausalito (2004).


John Bock
John Bock was born in Gribbohm, Germany in 1965, studied at the Hochschule für Bildende Künste in Hamburg and currently lives and works in Berlin. A performance artist and sculptor whose three-dimensional works have often served as props for his performances, Bock creates absurd, frenetic universes using a wildly eclectic range of materials and manic energy.


Solo exhibitions of his work include MienGribbohmWien, Wiener Secession, Vienna (1998); Regardez le Discjockey Long John Silver, El Niño, Städtisches Museum am Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach (1998); Lombardi Bängli, Kunsthalle, Basel (1999); Memme Muss Schlafen, Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst, Ghent (1999); Projects 71: John Bock, Museum of Modern Art, New York (2000); Klynken I knæk, Arken Museum for Moderne Kunst, Ishøj (2003); Meechfieber, Fondazione Nicola Trussardi, Milan (2004); Klutterkammer: John Bock Curates, Institute of Contemporary Art, London (2004); and John Bock, FRAC Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, Marseille (2005).


Group shows featuring Bock’s work include 1st Berlin Biennial (1998); 48th International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale (1999); Children of Berlin, P.S.1, New York (1999); German Open, Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg (1999); Ars viva 99/00 ¬– Grenzgänge, Kunsthaus Dresden (2000); Hypermental. Rampant Reality 1950-2000, Kunsthalle, Hamburg (2001); Yokohama International Triennial of Contemporary Art, Yokohama (2001); Extension, Magasin 3, Stockholm Konsthall, Stockholm (2002); Documenta 11, Kassel, Germany (2002); Sitings: Installation Art 1969–2002, The Geffen Contemporary, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2003); Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburg, (2004); What's New Pussycat?, Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt (2005); Dionysiac, Centre Pompidou, Paris (2005); When Humor Becomes Painful, Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zürich (2005); 51st Venice Biennale (2005); and Experiencing Duration, Lyon Biennale of Contemporary Art (2005).


Bock was awarded the Ars Viva 99/00 prize and was shortlisted for the Preis der Nationalgalerie für junge Kunst 2005.


Tacita Dean
Tacita Dean was born in Canterbury, England in 1965 and studied at the Falmouth School of Art in England, the Supreme School of Fine Art in Athens and the Slade School of Fine Art in London. Dean is best known for her compelling 16mm films, which, while focusing on architectural relics, portraiture, history, and memory, investigate cinematic mechanisms and materials.


Solo exhibitions of Dean’s work include Foley Artist, the ART NOW Project Room Tate Gallery, London (1996); Tacita Dean, Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia (1998); Tacita Dean, Madison Art Center, Madison (1999); Wandering Images, Sala Montcada, Fundació la Caixa, Barcelona (2000); Tacita Dean, Recent Films and other works, Tate Britain, London (2001); Tacita Dean, Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona, Barcelona (2001); Directions: Tacita Dean, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C. (2001); Tacita Dean, Museu de Arte Contemporanea de Serralves, Porto (2001); Tacita Dean, Kunstverein für Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf (2002); Premio Regione Piemonte 04, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin (2004); and Berlin Works, Tate St. Ives, Cornwall (2005).


Dean’s work has been featured in numerous group exhibitions including: Watt, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam (1994); Mise en Scene, Institute of Contemporary Art, London (1994); State of Mind, Centrum Beeldende Kunst, Rotterdam (1996); International Film Festival, Rotterdam (1997); Wounds: Between Democracy and Redemption in Contemporary Art, Moderna Museet, Stockholm (1998); Un monde reel, Fondation Cartier, Paris (1999); Artifice, Deste Foundation, Athens, (2000); Mixing Memory and Desire, Kunstmuseum Luzern, Lucerne (2000); New British Art 2000: Intelligence, Tate Gallery, London (2000); Vision and Reality, Louisiana Museum of Art, Humlebaek (2000); Media-City Seoul 2000, Contemporary Art and Technology Biennial, Seoul Metropolitan Museum, Seoul (2000); Elusive Paradise: The Millennium Prize, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (2001); Yokohama International Triennial of Contemporary Art, Yokohama (2001); Image Stream, The Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus (2003); Ritardi e Rivoluzioni and Utopia Station, 50th International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale (2003); The Moderns, Castello di Rivoli Museo d'Arte Contemporanea, Turin (2003); Universal Experience: Art, Life and the Tourist's Eye, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and Hayward Gallery, London (2005); and The Experience of Art, 51st Venice Biennale (2005).


Dean was nominated for the 1998 Turner Prize and for the Preis der Nationalgalerie für junge Kunst 2002. She is the recipient of a 2000–01 DAAD Scholarship; the 2002 Aachen Art Kunstpreis; the Premio Regione Piemonte from the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin (2004); and the Sixth Benesse Prize at the 51st International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale (2005).


Damián Ortega
Damián Ortega was born in Mexico in 1967 and currently lives and works in both Mexico City and Berlin. Touching on questions of social space and urban modernity with a poetic wit, Ortega’s sculptures and photographs instill everyday objects with new sociological or political meaning.


Solo exhibitions of his work include Alguem Me Soletra, Museu Serralves, Porto (2001); Cosmic Thing, Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia (2002); Damián Ortega, Museu de Arte da Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Brazil (2004); Damián Ortega, Kunsthalle, Basel (2004); The Uncertainty Principle, Tate Modern, London (2005); and Damián Ortega: The Beetle Trilogy and other works, The Museum of Contemporary Art and REDCAT Gallery, Los Angeles (2005).


Ortega’s work has been featured in a number of group shows including: Nuevas Practicas Colectivas, Galería de Arte Contemporáneo, Guadalajara (1995); Creación en Movimiento, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo Carrillo Gil, Mexico City (1997); Lines of Loss, Artists Space, New York (1997); Prepositions II, Musée Départamental d´Art Contemporain, Château de Rochechouart, France (1998); B.I.F. Bienal Internacional de Fotografia, Centro de la Imágen, México City (1999); Yo y mi Circunstancia, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts(1999); Guarene Arte 2000, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin (2000); Tirana Biennale, Tirana, Albania (2001); Ars 2001, Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki (2001); Squatters 2, Museu Serralves, Porto, and Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam (2001); Gwangju Biennale, Gwangju, South Korea (2002); Il Quotidiano Alterato, 50th International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale (2003); Made in Mexico, The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, and Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2004); Specific Objects: The Minimalist Influence, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, La Jolla (2004); inSITE_05: Farsites: Urban Crisis and Domestic Symptoms in Recent Contemporary Art, San Diego Museum of Art, San Diego–Tijuana (2005); Come Closer, Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin (2005); and T1: Torinotriennale Tremusei: The Pantagruel Syndrome, GAM Galleria Civica d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea di Torino, Turin (2005).


Ortega is the recipient of the 2005 Lisbon Colecção Teixeira de Freitas and will be participating in the 2006 DAAD residency program in Berlin.


Aïda Ruilova
Aïda Ruilova was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, in 1974 and currently lives and works in New York City. She received her BFA from the University of South Florida in 1999 and her MFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York in 2001. Ruilova, a video artist and musician, is best known for the dark, unsettling aesthetic that pervades her short looping videos of repeated discrete sounds and mysterious images.


Solo exhibits of Ruilova’s work have been organized by White Columns, NY (2000) in conjunction with the White Room project; Untitled, the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY (2003); and Let’s Go, The Moore Space, Miami (2004).


Group Exhibitions featuring Ruilova’s work include Casino 2001: 1st Quadrennial of Contemporary Art, Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst, Ghent (2001); Special Projects, P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City, New York (2001); Videodrome II, New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (2002); Disturbance, Prague Biennale, Prague (2003); Clandestines, 50th International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale (2003); Strange Days, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville, Florida (2003); Unplugged, Galleria Civica di Arte Contemporanea, Trento, Italy (2003); Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2004); Greater New York 2005, P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center (2005); T1: Torinotriennale Tremusei: The Pantagruel Syndrome, GAM Galleria Civica d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea di Torino, Turin (2005); Uncertain States of America, Astrup Fearnley Museum of Art, Oslo (2005); and Mixed Emotions, Haifa Museum of Art, Haifa (2005).


Ruilova has participated in the following film and video festivals: Impakt Festival 2002, Centraal Museum, Utrecht (2002); Images Festival, Toronto (2003); Impakt Festival 2003, Centraal Museum, Utrecht (2003); Videokunst: Geist, Gemeinschaft und Tschai, Athens (2004).


Tino Sehgal
Tino Sehgal was born in London in 1976 and currently lives in Berlin. Sehgal studied choreography and political economics, both of which inform his unique practice. Sehgal’s works, which often function as interventions in a museum or gallery environment, are not documented visually. He constructs situations focused on fleeting gestures that challenge the traditional museological context.


Solo exhibitions of Sehgal’s work have included Kiss, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Nantes (2004); Tino Sehgal, Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven (2004); Tino Sehgal, Institute of Contemporary Art, London (2005); Tino Sehgal, Fundacao Serralves, Porto (2005); and German Pavillion (with Thomas Scheibitz), 51st International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale (2005).


Group shows featuring Sehgal’s work include I’ll Never Let You Go, Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2001); Tirana Biennale 1, Tirana, Albania (2001); A Little Bit of History Repeated, Kunst-Werke, Berlin (2001); Do It, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo Carrillo Gil, Mexico City (2001); Manifesta 4, Städelmuseum, Frankfurt (2002); I Promise it’s Political, Museum Ludwig, Cologne (2002); Spectacular, Museum Kunst Palast, Düsseldorf (2003); Utopia Station, 50th International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale (2003); 24/7: Wilno-Nueva York, Contemporary Art Center, Vilnius, Lithuania (2003); Ailleurs, Ici, ARC-Musée d’art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Couvent des Cordeliers, Paris (2004); Lab, Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo (2004); Communauté, Institut d’art Contemporain, Lyon (2004); Formalismus: Moderne Kunst, heute, Kunstverein Hamburg, Hamburg (2004); 1st Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art, Former Lenin Museum, Moscow (2005); Situation, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2005); Yokohama International Triennial of Contemporary Art, Yokohama (2005).


Sehgal received the Kunstpreis der Böttcherstrasse in Bremen (2003) and the Art Basel Baloise Art Prize (2004).


#1028
December 2, 2005

FOR INFORMATION:
Betsy Ennis / Leily Soleimani
Public Affairs Department
Telephone: (212) 423-3840
publicaffairs@guggenheim.org