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Film Series

 

Three Major Series Engage Diverse Points of View in the Cinematic Experience


CinéKids: March 10 - April 28
Drama Queens: Women Behind the Camera: March 2 - 24
Conversations Between Shadows and Light: Masters of Italian Cinematography: April 4 - July 28


New York, February 14 - GuggenheimFilm, the film and video exhibition program of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, presents its Spring 2001 Season, featuring three major exhibitions: CinéKids, March 10 - April 28, the museum's new, ongoing children's film program, explores cinema from the point of view and interests of kids; Drama Queens: Women Behind the Camera, March 2 - March 24, offers a lively examination of films by pioneering women working in classic Hollywood and contemporary women directors working in independent film and video; and finally, the landmark series Conversations Between Shadows and Light: Masters of Italian Cinematography, April 4 - July 28, examines the focal contribution Italian cinematographers have made working in collaboration with acclaimed international directors. These three series are representative of GuggenheimFilm's focus on the diverse points of view that inform global cinema.


CinéKids, the Guggenehim's new children's film series, engages children in understanding media through thematic film programs. Both children and their adult companions will enjoy features, short films, live-action, and animation made for (and sometimes by) kids. Recent award-winning shorts will be showcased along with timeless classics, presenting the dynamic history and new directions in film and video for children. Storyteller Lisa Lipkin will introduce all programs and engage young audience members in discussions following the screenings. Programs, including live presentation, are approximately one hour.


Drama Queens: Women Behind the Camera features three thematic programs by women filmmakers, in which Hollywood films are paired with programs of new independent film and video. Drama Queens examines the strength and variety of approaches used by pioneering women directors Dorothy Arzner and Ida Lupino, and looks at similar strategies in innovative new works by contemporary women film and videomakers. Says curator Maria-Christina Villaseñor, "Drama Queens." is an attempt to transform a negative stereotype of women and show how adept contemporary women film and videomakers are at 'drama,' in features and short works. The film and videomakers featured here focus on women's issues in smart, witty, and engaging ways and bear a certain resemblance to works as different as the Hollywood features of Dorothy Arzner in the 30s and Ida Lupino in the 40s."


Conversations Between Shadows and Light: Masters of Italian Cinematography explores the substantial achievements of numerous Italian cinematographers. Series guest-curator and New York University Professor of Film Antonio Monda has selected an array of visionary cinematographers such as Vittorio Storaro, Carlo di Palma, Pasqualino De Santis, Dante Spinotti and Luca Bigazzi, whose collaborations with directors such as Michelangelo Antonioni, Woody Allen, Bernardo Bertolucci, Robert Bresson, Federico Fellini, Pier Paolo Pasolini, and Lucino Visconti are considered among the most visually stunning and successfully realized films in the history of the cinema. Monda states of the series, "Through this celebration of great Italian cinematography we will interrogate its nature as art and craft."


The Guggenheim's Senior Curator of Film and Media Arts, John G. Hanhardt says of the program, "Through the depth of its resources and international scope, the Guggenheim Museum provides a unique means to situate film and the media arts within the history and changing forces of today's global culture. The Spring 2001 season embodies our commitment to engage diverse points of view in the exploration of the cinematic experience." This inclusive, innovative approach to film presentation guides GuggenheimFilm programming in New York and Bilbao, Spain.


The 2001 Film and Media Arts Program is sponsored by Deutsche Bank.


Time Out New York is the media sponsor for the Film and Media Arts Program.


The Guggenheim's film and video programs are made possible with support from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency.


All programs are screened in the Peter B. Lewis Theater at The Sackler Center for Arts Education at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Screenings take place Wednesdays at 7 pm, Fridays at 7 pm, and Saturdays at noon, 3 and 7 pm.


Tickets are free with purchase of museum admission; members are admitted free of charge.


For CinéKids, Tickets are $5 for each child accompanied by one free adult; $5 for each additional adult (free for members and their children). There is one chaperone required for every four children: recommended for children 7-12 years.


Tickets are available on the day of the screening on a first-come, first-served basis. For evening screenings, any remaining tickets will be released to the public free of charge one half-hour before screening time. All programs are subject to change.


Film schedule: (212) 360-4321


Sign up for e-news: (212) 360-4236


Additional information: (212) 423-3618


Complete Schedule follows.


#924
February 28, 2001

For Press Information: Shannon Leib
Department of Public Affairs
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Telephone: (212) 423-3792
Telefax: (212) 423-3787
E-mail: sleib@guggenheim.org

For Film and Media Arts Information:
Rajendra Roy
Film and Media Arts Program
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Telephone: (212) 423-3841
Telefax: (212) 423-3787
E-mail: rroy@guggenheim.org


SCHEDULE
CINÉKIDS
March 10 - April 28, 2001

Saturday, March 10 @ noon
It's a Kid's World
Explore the world from the point of view and interests of children—sharing games, stories, places, and themes drawn from children's experiences around the globe. Two boys escape with the babysitter's car in Toycar; Otto imagines all the wonderful games his siblings are playing after he goes to bed; people eat Sour Death Balls and make all kinds of silly faces; a young girl throws a hilarious temper tantrum in Sientje; plus more fun shorts.

Saturday, March 24 @ noon
Kids Make Movies
Children and teenagers from across the country produce an exciting range of films and videos. New York City fifth-graders transform their school library into a horror film in Open; a Chicago girl imagines The Worst School Ever!; Minnesota students create a tribute to bug haiku in Tamamushi-iro; with other youth-made videos.

Saturday, April 14 @ noon
Show and Tell: Curious Collections
Shown in conjunction with the Guggenheim exhibition The Global Guggenheim: Selections from the Extended Collection, these films expand the notion of collecting and classifying. The Sound Collector creates a story on a rainy day; 601 moving portraits of elementary school students are captured in Picture Day; students transform their school building into The Memory Museum; plus other collecting films.

Saturday, April 28 @ noon
Blink!: The Art of Moving Pictures
A film can be created using many different tools and techniques. A child's drawings come to life in Push Me Pull Me; animated friends Noodles and Nedd make shadow puppets; Hepa!'s live-action and oil painted animation show us the excitement of capoeria dancers; even a Lite-Brite is used to make a film in Phi-Brite; and other works with additional animation techniques.

The program is presented in the Peter B. Lewis Theater at The Sackler Center for Arts Education in the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Tickets are $5 for each child accompanied by one free adult; $5 for each additional adult (free for members and their children). There is one chaperone required for every four children: recommended for children 7-12 years. Storyteller, Lisa Lipkin will introduce all programs and engage young audience members in discussions following the screenings. Programs, including live presentation, are approximately one hour.

SCHEDULE
DRAMA QUEENS: WOMEN BEHIND THE CAMERA
March 2 - March 24, 2001

In these three thematic programs by women filmmakers, Hollywood films are paired with programs of new independent film and video. Drama Queens examines the strength and variety of approaches used by pioneering women directors Dorothy Arzner and Ida Lupino, and looks at similar strategies in innovative new works by contemporary women film and videomakers.

Performance: In The Bride Wore Red Joan Crawford gives a split performance as a poor dancehall girl who masquerades as a high-society woman on holiday. In As the Girl Turns..., femininity and performance are explored in short pieces in which impersonation and role playings are front and center.

Fri March 2, 7 pm and Sat March 3, 3 pm
The Bride Wore Red (1937), Dorothy Arzner, 103 min.,b&w

Sat March 3, 7 pm and Fri March 23, 7 pm
As the Girl Turns...
Out of This World (1998), Nurit Newman, 6 min.
I Am Crazy and You're Not Wrong (1997), Anne McGuire, 11 min.
Devil in the Flesh (1998), Ximena Cuevas, 5 min.
The Amateurist (1998), Miranda July, 14 min.
Sapphire and the Slave Girl (1999), Leah Gilliam, 17 min.,
Shulie (1997), Elisabeth Subrin, 37 min.

The Female Gaze: Lupino's first film, Not Wanted, is unique in its representation of the female perspective in this story of a young woman in 1950s America. Scope-Ophelias focuses on the female point of view, in which stalkers, peeping tom-ettes, and revisionist versions of commercials and Hollywood films show us a witty range of contemporary female perspectives.

Fri March 9, 7 pm and Sat March 10, 3 pm
Not Wanted (1949), Ida Lupino (screen credited director: Elmer Clifton), 94 min., b&w

Sat March 10, 7 pm and Sat March 24, 3 pm
Scope-Ophelias
Joe DiMaggio 1, 2, 3 (1993), Anne McGuire, 11 min.
Heaven (1997), Tracey Moffat, excerpt from 28 min. piece
Room 1503 in a Row (2000), Phyllis Baldino, 6 min.
Removed (1999), Naomi Uman, 8 min.
I Like Men (2000), Anne McGuire, 1 min.
Lip (1999), Tracey Moffat, 10 min.
Embrace (2000), Alix Pearlstein, 3 min.
Spank (1999), Diane Nerwen, 8 min.
Suet Sin's Sisters (1999), Yau Ching, 8 min.
Invested Objects: In Craig's Wife, Rosalind Russell plays a woman who seeks control in her life by controlling her house, obsessively devoted to the house and its objects at the expense of everything else. In the contemporary films and videos in Objects and Desire, inanimate objects and pets take on starring roles.

Fri March 16, 7 pm and Sat March 17, 3 pm
Craig's Wife (1936), Dorothy Arzner, 73 min., b&w

Sat March 17, 7 pm, and Sat March 24, 7 pm
Objects and Desire
On Writing Hat Poems (2001), Francesca Talenti, 2 min.
Lazy Susan (2000), Silvia Gruner, 4 min.
Love of Three Oranges (1993), Naomi Uman, 9 min.
For You/Para Usted (1998), Liliana Porter, excerpt from 16 min. piece.
Godiva (1997), Ursula Hodel, 5 min.
Mess with the Bull (2000), Diana Dawson, 3 min.
For You/Para Usted (1998), Liliana Porter, 16 min.
Loss Prevention (2000), Jeanne Finley, 19 min.
Animal Attraction (2000), Kathy High, 59 min.

Conversations Between Shadows and Light: Italian Cinematography
April 4 - July 28, 2001
Screening Schedule

All works are film, color, and sound, unless otherwise noted.

Fri April 6, 7 pm and Sat April 7, 3 pm
The Conformist (Il Conformista, 1970), Bernardo Bertolucci, 110 min., (Cinematographer: Vittorio Storaro)

Wed April 11, 7 pm and Sat April 14, 7 pm
Radio Days (1986), Woody Allen, 85 min., (Cinematographer: Carlo di Palma)

Fri April 13, 7 pm and Sat April 14, 3 pm
Red Desert (Il Deserto Rosso, 1964), Michelangelo Antonioni, 120 min., (Cinematographer: Carlo di Palma)

Fri April 20, 7 pm and Sat April 21, 7 pm
La Terra Trema (1948), Luchino Visconti, 160 min., b&w, (Cinematographer: Aldo Graziati)

Wed April 18, 7 pm and Sat April 21, 3 pm
Umberto D (1952), Vittorio De Sica, 91 min., b&w, (Cinematographer: Aldo Graziati)

Fri April 27, 7 pm and Sat April 28, 3 pm
Francesco Giullare di Dio (1950), Roberto Rossellini, 75 min., b&w, (Cinematographer: Otello Martelli)

Wed April 25, 7 pm and Sat April 28, 7 pm
La Dolce Vita (1960), Federico Fellini, 167 min., b&w, (Cinematographer: Otello Martelli)

Wed May 2, 7 pm and Sat May 5, 7 pm
Nights of Cabiria (Le Notti di Cabiria, 1957), Federico Fellini, 117 min., b&w, (Cinematographer: Aldo Tonti)

Fri May 4, 7 pm and Sat May 5, 3 pm
Ossessione (1942), Luchino Visconti, 142 min., b&w, (Cinematographer: Aldo Tonti)

Wed May 9, 7 pm and Sat May 12, 7 pm
Once Upon a Time in America (1984), Sergio Leone, 227 min., (Cinematographer: Tonino Delli Colli)

Fri May 11, 7 pm and Sat May 12, 3 pm
Mamma Roma (1962), Pier Paolo Pasolini, 110 min., b&w, (Cinematographer: Tonino Delli Colli)

Fri May 18, 7 pm and Sat May 19, 3 pm
Salvatore Giuliano (1961), Francesco Rosi, 120 min., b&w, (Cinematographer: Gianni di Venanzo)

Sat May 19, 7 pm
8 (1963), Federico Fellini, 145 min., b&w, (Cinematographer: Gianni di Venanzo)

Fri May 25, 7 pm and Sat May 26, 3 pm
The Leopard (Il Gattopardo, 1963), Luchino Visconti, 205 min., b&w, (Cinematographer: Giuseppe Rotunno)

Sat May 26, 7 pm
Casanova (1976), Federico Fellini, 166 min. (Cinematographer: Giuseppe Rotunno)

Fri June 1, 7 pm and Sat June 2, 3 pm
The Conjugal Bed (L'Ape Regina, 1963), Marco Ferreri, 85 min., (Cinematographer: Ennio Guarnieri)

Sat June 2, 7 pm
The Garden of the Finzi-Continis (Il Giardino dei Finzi-Contini, 1970), Vittorio de Sica, 94 min., (Cinematographer: Ennio Guarnieri)

Sat June 9, 7 pm
The Passenger (Professione: Reporter, 1975), Michelangelo Antonioni, 124 min., (Cinematographer: Luciano Tovoli)

Fri June 8, 7 pm and Sat June 9, 3 pm
Titus (1999), Julie Taymor, 162 min., (Cinematographer: Luciano Tovoli)

Fri June 15, 7 pm and Sat June 16, 7 pm
Death in Venice (Morte a Venezia, 1971), Luchino Visconti, 135 min., (Cinematographer: Pasqualino de Santis)

Sat June 16, 3 pm
Lancelot du Lac (1974), Robert Bresson, 85 min., (Cinematographer: Pasqualino de Santis)

Sat June 30, 3 pm
Adua and Company (Adua e le Compagne, 1960), Antonio Pietrangeli, 106 min., (Cinematographer: Armando Nannuzzi)

Sat June 30, 7 pm
La Nuit de Varennes (1982), Ettore Scola, 122 min., (Cinematographer: Armando Nannuzzi)

Fri July 6, 7 pm and Sat July 7, 3 pm
Dark Eyes (Ochi Chyornye, 1987), Nikita Mikhalkov, 118 min., (Cinematographer: Franco Di Giacomo)

Sat July 7, 7 pm
The Night of the Shooting Stars (La Notte di San Lorenzo, 1982), Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, 105 min., (Cinematographer: Franco Di Giacomo)

Sat July 14, 3 pm
Nostalghia (1984), Andrej Tarkovsky, 125 min., b&w and color, (Cinematographer: Beppe Lanci)

Fri July 13, 7 pm and Sat July 14, 7 pm
Chaos (Kaos, 1984), Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, 188 min., (Cinematographer: Beppe Lanci)

Fri July 20, 7 pm and Sat July 21, 3 pm
The Legend of the Holy Drinker (La Leggenda del Santo Bevitore, 1988), Ermanno Olmi, 125 min., (Cinematographer: Dante Spinotti)

Wed July 18, 7 pm and Sat July 21, 7 pm
The Insider (1999), Michael Mann, 157 min., (Cinematographer: Dante Spinotti)

Fri July 27, 7 pm and Sat July 28, 3 pm
The Uncle from Brooklyn (Lo Zio di Brooklyn, 1995), Daniele Ciprì and Franco Maresco, 98 min., b&w, (Cinematographer: Luca Bigazzi)

Sat July 28, 7 pm
Lamerica (1994), Gianni Amelio, 125 min., (Cinematographer: Luca Bigazzi)