Schedule of Exhibitions Through 2013

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SCHEDULE OF EXHIBITIONS THROUGH 2013

The information below is subject to change.

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Picasso Black and White
October 5, 2012–January 23, 2013

Picasso Black and White marks the first major exhibition to focus on the recurrent motif of black and white throughout Pablo Picasso’s career. Surveying his oeuvre from 1904 to 1971, Picasso Black and White examines the artist’s lifelong exploration of a black-and-white palette through 118 paintings and a selection of sculptures and works on paper. The exhibition thematically traces the artist’s unique vision throughout his work, including early monochromatic blue and rose paintings, gray-toned Cubist canvases, elegant and austere neoclassical portraits and nudes, Surrealist-inspired figures, forceful and somber scenes depicting the atrocities of war, allegorical still lifes, vivid interpretations of art-historical masterpieces, and the electric, highly sexualized canvases of Picasso’s last years. The exhibition includes significant loans drawn from private collections, including many from the Picasso family; from museums across Europe and the United States; and from numerous public and private European and American collections, many of which have not been exhibited or published before. The exhibition is organized by Carmen Giménez, Stephen and Nan Swid Curator of Twentieth-Century Art, with assistance from Karole Vail, Associate Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Picasso Black and White is sponsored by Bank of America. Major support is provided by the Picasso Black and White Leadership Committee: Christina and Robert C. Baker, Chairs; Acquavella Galleries; The Aaron I. Fleischman Foundation ; Gagosian Gallery; J. Ira and Nicki Harris Foundation; The Lauder Foundation—Leonard and Evelyn Lauder Fund; Phyllis and William Mack; Nancy C. and Richard R. Rogers; Stephen and Nan Swid; and Patricia and George Weiss. Additional support is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation, and the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation. This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Now’s the Time: Recent Acquisitions
November 4, 2012–January 2, 2013
Now's the Time: Recent Acquisitions surveys some of the most exciting contemporary artworks acquired by the Guggenheim in the past five years and reflects the global scope of the museum’s collection. Representing a cross section of contemporary art practice, the exhibition spans painting, sculpture, photography, and installations, and features work by both established and emerging artists. Highlights include Ai Weiwei’s China Log (2005), a monumental sculpture of ironwood pillars reclaimed by the artist from a dismantled Qing dynasty temple; Danh Vo’s Das Beste oder Nichts (2010), which incorporates the engine of his father’s car, an artifact charged with complex personal and political meanings; and James Casebere’s elaborately staged Storefront (1982), a subtle meditation on the reality of the photographic image and the anonymity of consumer culture. In addition to work by established figures such as Hans Peter Feldmann, Lyle Ashton Harris, and Barbara Kruger, Now’s the Time will present the work of younger artists in the collection, such as Christiane Feser, and Ryan Trecartin, among others. The exhibition is curated by Lauren Hinkson, Assistant Curator for Collections, and Carmen Hermo, Curatorial Assistant for Collections.

The Deutsche Bank Series at the Guggenheim: Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms
November 9, 2012–January 13, 2013

Gabriel Orozco’s Asterisms is a two-part sculptural and photographic installation comprising thousands of items of detritus Orozco has gathered at two sites—a playing field near the artist’s home in New York and a protected coastal biosphere in Baja California, Mexico, that is also the repository for flows of industrial and commercial waste from across the Pacific Ocean. The two newly commissioned works invoke several recurring themes in Orozco’s oeuvre, including the traces of erosion, poetic encounters with mundane materials, and the ever-present tension between nature and culture. The exhibition is organized by Nancy Spector, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, and Joan Young, Director, Curatorial Affairs, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and is accompanied by a richly illustrated catalogue. This exhibition is made possible by Deutsche Bank. The Leadership Committee for Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms is gratefully acknowledged for its support: Katherine Farley and Jerry I. Speyer, Marieluise Hessel and Ed Artzt, and Larry and Marilyn Fields.

Zarina: Paper Like Skin
January 25–April 21, 2013

The exhibition Zarina: Paper Like Skin, organized by Allegra Pesenti, Curator, Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, travels to the Guggenheim Museum as part of its international tour. This retrospective of Indian-born American artist Zarina Hashmi is the first major exploration of the artist’s career, charting a developmental arc from her work in the 1960s to the present and includes many seminal works from the late 1960s and early 1970s, woodblock prints, etchings and lithographs, and a small selection of related sculptures in bronze and cast paper. The Guggenheim’s recent acquisition of 20 works from a major series of pin drawings from 1975 to 1977 serves as a fulcrum for the New York presentation, which is conceived in close collaboration with the artist. An exhibition catalogue provides insights into her life and work. The New York presentation is organized by Helen Hsu, Assistant Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Zarina: Paper Like Skin was organized by the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. The Leadership Committee for Zarina: Paper Like Skin is gratefully acknowledged for its support.

Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative
No Country: Contemporary Art for South and Southeast Asia
February 22–May 22, 2013

This is the first of three traveling exhibitions that will be organized as part of a five-year project that will chart creative activity and contemporary art around the world. Guggenheim UBS MAP will identify and support a network of art, artists, and curators from South and Southeast Asia; Latin America; and the Middle East and North Africa in a comprehensive program involving curatorial residencies, acquisitions for the Guggenheim’s collection, international touring exhibitions, and far-reaching educational activities. The first of three appointed curators from the focus regions is June Yap, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, South and Southeast Asia, who will select new or recent artworks that represent key artists, movements, collaboratives, and creative networks from selected countries in South and Southeast Asia that may include Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burma, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. Each exhibition will be accompanied by a dynamic, customized suite of audience-driven education programs for the public, both at the exhibition venues and online. This exhibition will travel to two venues in South and Southeast Asia and in a major city elsewhere in the world. The Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative is supported by UBS.

Gutai: Splendid Playground
February 15–May 8, 2013

As part of the Guggenheim’s Asian Art Initiative, the museum presents North America’s first museum exhibition devoted to Gutai, the most influential artists’ collective and artistic movement in postwar Japan and one of the most important international avant-garde movements of the 1950s and 1960s. Organized thematically and chronologically to explore Gutai’s inventive approach to materials, process, and performativity, the exhibition explores the group’s radical experimentation across a range of media and styles and demonstrates how individual artists pushed the limits of what art could be in a postatomic age. The spectrum of works includes painting, experimental performance and film, indoor and outdoor installation art, sound art, interactive or “playful” art, light art, and Kinetic art. The exhibition comprises some 120 objects by 25 artists on loan from museum and private collections in Japan, the United States, and Europe, and offers new scholarship, especially on so-called late Gutai works that date from 1965 to 1972. Gutai: Splendid Playground is organized by Ming Tiampo, Associate Professor of Art History, Carleton University, Ottawa, and Alexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator of Asian Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Gutai: Splendid Playground is supported in part by the Henry Luce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, The Japan Foundation, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, the W.L.S. Spencer Foundation, Tokio Marine Holdings, the United States–Japan Foundation, and the Dedalus Foundation, Inc. The Leadership Committee for Gutai: Splendid Playground is gratefully acknowledged for its support: Hauser & Wirth, Yoko Ono Lennon, Axel Vervoordt Gallery, Cindy and Howard Rachofsky, Tina Kim and Jae Woong Chung, Marianne Boesky Gallery, Richard Roth, and those who wish to remain anonymous.

THE HUGO BOSS PRIZE 2012: Danh Vo
March–May 2013

The Hugo Boss Prize 2012 has been awarded to Danh Vo, the ninth artist to receive the biennial honor that was established in 1996 to recognize significant achievement in contemporary art. An exhibition of Vo’s work will be on view at the Guggenheim Museum in spring 2013. Vo was selected by an international jury of curators from a list of six finalists which also included Trisha Donnelly, Rashid Johnson, Qiu Zhijie, Monika Sosnowska, and Tris Vonna-Michell. Previous winners include Matthew Barney (1996), Douglas Gordon (1998), Marjetica Potrc (2000), Pierre Huyghe (2002), Rirkrit Tiravanija (2004), Tacita Dean (2006), Emily Jacir (2008), and Hans-Peter Feldmann (2010). The Hugo Boss Prize 2012: Danh Vo is organized by Katherine Brinson, Associate Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and is made possible by HUGO BOSS.

James Turrell
June 21–September 25, 2013

James Turrell’s first exhibition in a New York museum since 1980 focuses on the artist’s groundbreaking explorations of perception, light, color, and space, with a special focus on the role of site-specificity in his practice. At its core is a major new project that recasts the Guggenheim rotunda as an enormous volume filled with shifting artificial and natural light. One of the most dramatic transformations of the museum ever conceived, the installation reimagines Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic architecture—its openness to nature, graceful curves, and magnificent sense of space—as one of Turrell’s Skyspaces, referencing in particular his magnum opus Roden Crater (1976–). Reorienting visitors’ experiences of the rotunda from above to below, the exhibition gives form to the air and light occupying the museum’s central void, proposing an entirely new experience of the building. Other works from throughout the artist’s career will be displayed in the museum’s Annex Level galleries, offering a complement and counterpoint to the new work in the rotunda. Organized in conjunction with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, James Turrell  comprises one-third of a major retrospective exhibition spanning the United States during summer 2013. This exhibition is curated by Carmen Giménez, Stephen and Nan Swid Curator of Twentieth-Century Art, and Nat Trotman, Associate Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. The Leadership Committee for James Turrell is gratefully acknowledged for its support.

Robert Motherwell: The Early Collages (working title)
September 27, 2013-January 5, 2014

The Guggenheim Museum is organizing an exhibition devoted exclusively to papier collés and related works on paper from the 1940s and early 1950s by the American artist Robert Motherwell. By reexamining the artist’s origins and his engagement with this technique, which he described in 1944 as “the greatest of our [art] discoveries,” the exhibition will investigate the artist’s work during a pivotal decade in his career. Featuring approximately 50 artworks, the exhibition also honors Peggy Guggenheim’s early patronage. At her urging, and under the tutelage of émigré Surrealist artist Roberto Matta, Motherwell first experimented with the papier collé technique. As he recalled years later “I might never have done it otherwise, and it was here that I found . . . my identity.” The exhibition will open at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, in June 2013, and travel to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, in September 2013. This exhibition is curated by Susan Davidson, Senior Curator, Collections and Exhibitions. The Leadership Committee for Robert Motherwell: The Early Collages is gratefully acknowledged for its support.

Christopher Wool
October 25, 2013–January 22, 2014

At the heart of Christopher Wool’s creative project, which spans three decades of rigorous and highly focused practice, is the question of how a picture can be conceived, realized, and experienced today. Engaging the complexities of painting as a medium, as well as the anxious rhythms of the urban environment and a wide range of cultural references, his agile, largely monochrome works propose an open-ended series of responses to this central problem. This retrospective will fill the museum’s Frank Lloyd Wright–designed rotunda and an adjacent gallery with a rich selection of paintings, photographs, and works on paper, forming the most comprehensive examination to date of Wool’s influential career. The exhibition is organized by Katherine Brinson, Associate Curator, and will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue. This exhibition is supported by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. The Leadership Committee for Christopher Wool is gratefully acknowledged for its support.

Italian Futurism, 1909–44

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, February 21–May 14, 2014
Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, June 17–September 19, 2014

With this major exhibition, the Guggenheim organizes the first comprehensive overview of Italian Futurism to be presented in the United States or Spain. This multidisciplinary exhibition will examine the historical sweep of the movement, from its inception with F. T. Marinetti’s Futurist manifesto in 1909 through its demise at the end of World War II. With over 300 works executed between 1909 and 1944, the exhibition encompasses not only painting and sculpture, but also architecture, design, ceramics, fashion, film, photography, advertising, free-form poetry, publications, music, theater, and performance. To convey the myriad artistic languages employed by the Futurists as they evolved over a 35-year period, this chronological exhibition will integrate multiple disciplines in each section. This exhibition is organized by Vivien Greene, Curator, 19th- and Early 20th-Century Art. In addition, an eminent international advisory committee has been assembled to provide expertise and guidance (list available upon request). The Leadership Committee for Italian Futurism, 1909-1944 is gratefully acknowledged for its support.

Ongoing Exhibitions

Kandinsky 1911–1913
More than any other 20th-century painter, Vasily Kandinsky has been closely linked to the history of the Guggenheim Museum. Hilla Rebay—artist, art advisor, and the museum’s first director—promoted nonobjective painting above all other forms of abstraction. She was particularly inspired by the work and writing of Kandinsky, a pioneer of abstraction, who believed that the task of the painter was to convey his own inner world, rather than imitate the natural world. The museum’s holdings have grown to include more than 150 works by Kandinsky, and focused exhibitions of his works are presented in Annex Level 3. The current installation, Kandinsky 1911–1913, highlights paintings completed at the moment the artist made great strides toward complete abstraction and published his aesthetic treatise, On the Spiritual in Art (1911, though dated 1912). Also featured are paintings by Robert Delaunay and Franz Marc that were exhibited alongside the work of Kandinsky and others in the landmark 1912 Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) exhibition held at the Moderne Galerie Heinrich Thannhauser, Munich. The exhibition is organized by Tracey Bashkoff, Curator, Collections and Exhibitions, and Megan Fontanella, Assistant Curator, Collections and Provenance, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

A Long-Awaited Tribute: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian House and Pavilion
July 27, 2012–February 13, 2013
On October 22, 1953, the exhibition Sixty Years of Living Architecture: The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright opened in New York on the site where the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum would be built. Constructed specifically for the exhibition were two Frank Lloyd Wright–designed buildings: a temporary pavilion made of glass, fiberboard, and pipe columns, and a 1,700-square-foot, fully furnished two-bedroom Usonian exhibition house representing Wright’s organic solution for modest, middle-class dwellings. This presentation on view in the Sackler Center for Arts Education pays tribute to these two structures, which, as Wright himself noted, represented a long-awaited tribute as the first Wright buildings to be erected in New York. This exhibition is organized by Francine Snyder, Director of Library and Archives, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

The Thannhauser Collection
Bequeathed to the museum by art dealer and collector Justin K. Thannhauser, the Thannhauser Collection includes a selection of canvases, works on paper, and sculpture that represents the earliest works in the museum’s collection. The Thannhauser holdings include significant works by Paul Cézanne, Edgar Degas, Paul Gauguin, Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, Pablo Picasso, Camille Pissarro, and Vincent van Gogh. Thannhauser’s commitment to supporting the early careers of such artists as Vasily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, and Franz Marc, and to educating the public about modern art, paralleled the vision of the Guggenheim Foundation’s originator, Solomon R. Guggenheim. Among the works Thannhauser gave are such incomparable masterpieces as Van Gogh’s Mountains at Saint-Rémy (Montagnes à Saint-Rémy, July 1889), Manet’s Before the Mirror (Devant la glace, 1876), and close to 30 paintings and drawings by Picasso, including his seminal works Le Moulin de la Galette (autumn 1900) and Woman Ironing (La Repasseuse, spring 1904).

VISITOR INFORMATION
Admission: Adults $22, students/seniors (65+) $18, members and children under 12 free. Admission includes an audio tour with highlights of the Guggenheim’s permanent collection and building available in English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish.

Museum Hours: Sun–Wed, 10 am–5:45 pm; Fri, 10 am–5:45 pm; Sat, 10 am–7:45 pm; closed Thurs. On Saturdays, beginning at 5:45 pm, the museum hosts Pay What You Wish. Extended hours from 10 am–7:45 pm will be offered on Sun, June 24 and Mon, June 25. For general information call 212 423 3500 or visit the museum online at:

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#1250
December 11 (Updated from June 26, 2012)

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