See Major Works by Benedetta, Depero, and Balla before Galleries Close August 20

Benedetta (Benedetta Cappa Marinetti), Syntheses of Communications (Sintesi delle comunicazioni), 1933–34

On August 20, Annex Levels 5 and 7, the galleries presenting the Post Office murals by Benedetta (Cappa Marinetti) and major theatrical works by Giacomo Balla and Fortunato Depero as part of Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, close. The main body of of the exhibition in the Guggenheim’s Frank Lloyd Wright Rotunda remains on view through September 1.

The works leaving the exhibition include Benedetta’s Syntheses of Communications (1933–34), which have never before been shown outside of their original location in Italy. A series of five large-scale paintings that were commissioned for a conference room in the central post office of Palermo, Sicily, each panel of the Syntheses celebrates the achievements of technology, portraying different forms of communication: telegraph and telephone, radio, overland, marine, and aerial. Benedetta was one of Futurism’s most accomplished second-generation painters and writers; F .T. Marinetti, the movement’s founder, was her husband.

Also closing is the immersive light and sound environment focusing on Giacomo Balla’s designs for Igor Stravinsky’s Fireworks, including a fast-changing theatrical lighting sequence based on Balla’s own notes and synched to Stravinsky’s dramatic music.

Italian Futurism, 1909–1944 has been praised by the New York Times as an “epic… phenomenal show” and presents more than 360 works that demonstrate the full historical and artistic sweep of Futurism in Italy, ranging from the movement’s ground-breaking poetic and typographic experimentation to its efforts to transform everyday life.

Explore the themes and a time line of Italian Futurism on the exhibition website, read more about the movement on the Guggenheim’s blog, and buy tickets to the museum.

Benedetta (Benedetta Cappa Marinetti), Syntheses of Communications (Sintesi delle comunicazioni), 1933–34. Tempera and encaustic on canvas, dimensions variable. Palazzo delle Poste di Palermo, Sicily, Poste Italiane © Benedetta Cappa Marinetti, used by permission of Vittoria Marinetti and Luce Marinetti’s heirs. Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014. Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

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Marxz Rosado, The Process for Attaining the Signature of Pedro Albizu Campos in Neon Lights (Proceso para conseguir la firma de Pedro Albizu Campos en luces de neón), 1977–2002

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