Play
Curating Play, Part II

With the theoretical issues I raised in my previous post in mind, I’m going to present some suggestions that might begin to address the practical concerns that they raise. To wit: one way of offering insight while enhancing the visitor’s experience (both online and at the various Guggenheim museums) would be to have YouTube Play’s jurors, curators, and artists provide commentary tracks for the pieces, which could be selected or ignored, much in the manner of more conventional exhibition audio-guides or DVD extras. Another way would be to invite both Play participants and viewers to remix or re-curate each other’s work. This would not only speak to the user-generated capacities of the material’s origins, but also provide new associations with—and provocative juxtapositions of—the works on display.

More...
 
Moving Images
The Art of Platforms

As a consequence of their ease of use, and as a result of their mass popularity, Internet platforms have become the preeminent domain of and locus for the development of collective authorship. Their speed, ease, and omnipresence make them extremely well suited as a place for quickly launching ideas, responding to others, or adapting existing work and reusing it. A new generation of artists use platforms like YouTube to simultaneously work with others and create new works on the spot. A single idea, concept, or video gets transformed in different variations through easy online sharing—the comment being the essential element for continuous development. The artworks that arise from these collective processes lie in a continuum with other works, references, and commentaries, often leading to different versions and forms of one work.

More...
 
Play
Curating Play, Part I

In my first post, I said that YouTube Play offered a unique opportunity for the museum to investigate the shifting sands of our visual culture. I want to follow up on that idea by talking about how the museum might take up the curatorial challenge presented by Play.

More...
 
Moving Images
Infermental

I am sitting in Southend Central library, a minor classic of provincial Brutalist architecture by the southern English coast, watching a pop video from 1984 by Yello in a purpose-built screening room designed by the artist James Richards (who recently featured in the New Museum’s Younger Than Jesus exhibition).

More...
 
Play
Juror Focus: Marilyn Minter

On Monday, September 20, the shortlist for YouTube Play was announced. These 125 videos will now be viewed by the jury, whose top 20 selections will be presented at the museum on October 21 and 22. In the following interview, we sat down with artist and juror Marilyn Minter to get her thoughts on art, life, advertising on TV, and kittens on YouTube.

More...
 
 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9