Residencies

Residencies

2014–15 Learning Through Art Residencies

Listed below are brief overviews of the LTA residencies from the 2014–15 school year.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Time Collaged
PS 8, Brooklyn
Grade 3

Teaching Artist
Rose Nestler

Student artists at PS 8 grappled with complex ideas when they wondered, “How are our lives affected by time?” They learned to differentiate between mechanical time, which is measured by the clock, and personal time, which is measured through personal growth and self-realization. Each week, students added to a collage to document their artistic process over time. Their collages are composed of elements from projects spanning the length of the residency, documenting chronological time, and each student’s artistic development.

 

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Collaborative Cultures
PS 8, Brooklyn
Grade 4

Teaching Artist
Jeff Hopkins

Student artists in Brooklyn Heights created groups called “cultures” within their own classroom as they explored their essential question, “What happens when cultures collide?” After breaking into groups of similar interests and choosing themes such as family or sports, student artists used simple construction techniques to create three-dimensional sculptures with cardboard and tape. These individual groups combined their sculptures to form a class monument using various materials and found objects that have personal meaning. As their monuments grew, the groups needed to change and adapt. This process allowed students to learn that not only can “cultures collide,” they also accommodate, combine, and adapt as they transform.

 

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Turning the Page: From Ordinary to Extraordinary
PS 9, Brooklyn
Grade 5

Teaching Artist
Susan Hamburger

Student artists answered the question, “How can we transform the ordinary into the extraordinary?” To do so, they turned to something that fills their classroom: books. Inspired by the physicality of books as well as the ideas contained within them, they created their own books using construction and printing techniques. Students explored collage, drawing, and printmaking, ultimately creating books with visual narratives that reflect stories of personal meaning.

 

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Character Conflation
PS 88, Queens
Grade 3

Teaching Artist
Jessica Bottalico

Each third grader at PS 88 in Ridgewood, Queens, created an animal mask with character traits similar to their own. While making the masks, student artists discovered how color, shape, line, and texture can be used to communicate emotion. The project gave students the opportunity to imagine how character develops over time.

 

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Time Trio
PS 88, Queens
Grade 5

Teaching Artist
Joanna Warren

Student artists at PS 88 in Ridgewood, Queens, studied the daily routine of Japanese Conceptual artist On Kawara (1933–2014) to better understand his seemingly simple works of art. They thought about ways they could document their past, present, and future lives using art materials. The completed project is a three-part composition that documents their individual lives through a variety of mediums.

Past: Place (painting)
Present: Self-Portrait (pencil and chalk pastel)
Future: Found-Object Mobile (wire and mixed media)

 

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Practical Imaginary Classrooms
PS 144, Queens
Grade 3

Teaching Artist
Molly O’Brien

Inspired by architects Frank Gehry and Frank Lloyd Wright, student artists considered shape, line, and form when they created models of their ideal classroom. Employing “design thinking,” they explored innovative ideas for redesigning a classroom through sculpture. As young product and interior designers, they experimented with multiple possibilities by building prototypes. Students explored options for the shape of a classroom by creating small paper sculptures before they built three-dimensional classroom models from wire, plastic, paper, foam, metal, and found objects.

 

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Visualizing Time
PS 86, Bronx
Grade 4

Teaching Artist
Molly O’Brien

PS 86 fourth-grade student artists contemplated the idea of time and the challenges of portraying it. Through various exercises and discussions they explored ways that time could become visible. Influenced by the works of On Kawara and Surrealist painters, they created acrylic paintings on canvas that juxtapose small (everyday) moments and significant (historical and current) events. Over a number of weeks, students layered the different content, taking into consideration how time played a role in these events. The layering process resulted in earlier aspects of the paintings intentionally being hidden from the viewer and guided the students in thinking about the ephemeral and the process of art making.

 

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

On the Same Page
PS 86, Bronx
Grade 6

Teaching Artist
Jeff Hopkins

Student artists repurposed old, discarded books to create a collaborative installation that transformed the school. Students began by manipulating, deconstructing, and rebuilding the books and then worked on a variety of explorations in which they painted over text or cut and folded pages. In addition, student artists in this residency used the app Paper, created by the company FiftyThree, on individual iPads. Using technology allowed students to explore the differences between digital and analog drawing. The final installations convey the students’ feelings about books they have read, freedom of information, and the power of words. A portion of the school’s installation is on view in this exhibition.

 

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Pathways through Red Hook
PS 676, Brooklyn
Grades 4 and 5

Teaching Artist
Joey Weiss

Student artists at PS 676 explored the concept of time within their lives and their community. Their artworks include a “path/timeline” of their life to date along with a painting of a warehouse in their neighborhood of Red Hook, Brooklyn, which has changed both in appearance and use over an extended period of time. Through these explorations, students are able to explore and combine the personal day-to-day time of each student’s life with the “big” historical time embodied by the changing warehouse.

 

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Nature Strands
PS 317, Queens
Grade 2

Teaching Artist
Judy Hoffman

With a strong emphasis on observation, second graders at PS 317 reflected on their unique relationship to nature as inhabitants of Rockaway Beach. Student artists analyzed nature specimens from beach walks, including plants and vegetables, through drawing, painting, and collage. Each student asked, “Where is nature in my life and how does it inspire me?” They created linear assemblages of observed and imagined nature paintings along with found objects, attached to floral wire and painted fabric. Each student’s work is hung in an overlapping manner, where the strands hover and vibrate as a group, woven together as one collective installation.

 

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

“Walking” Animals
PS 28, Manhattan
Grade 2

Teaching Artist
Megan Pahmier

As they learned about Pacific Northwest Native Americans, the Yoruba of Nigeria, and the Olmecs and Mayans in Mexico, second graders at PS 28 explored how animals play an important role in society. Students engaged in visual arts, narrative storytelling, and movement play to develop empathy skills. Given the choice to embody an animal, each student artist chose an animal based on characteristics and habitat, and depicted it on top of their walking stick sculptures. This series of sculptures acknowledges the necessity for people to assume another’s perspective in the world.

 

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

My World, Represented
PS 48, Staten Island
Grade 3

Teaching Artist
Emily Melander

When faced with the question of how do they relate to the world around them, third graders at PS 48 observed and documented points of interest in their local community. They pondered their relationships to people, places, and things, near and far, and depicted those relationships in painted form. Student artists practiced methods of representation, as well as abstraction, to respond to their surroundings. They used color, shape, brushstroke, and movement to express how they relate to and feel about the world around them.

 

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

A Brave New School
PS 9, Brooklyn
Grade 4

Teaching Artist
James Reynolds

Students at PS 9 know that their growing community will soon be too large for their current school. Inspired by architects Frank Gehry and Frank Lloyd Wright, student artists created models of a new and improved school, designed to ensure academic success. Given the challenge of reinventing their current space, student artists researched the design of educational facilities, thought creatively about how to improve their traditional space, and experimented with the form and function of their school, inside and out.

 

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Engineering Sculpture
PS 48, Staten Island
Grade 4

Teaching Artist
Rose Nestler

Throughout the year, student artists learned about kinetic energy and discovered ways to make moving sculptures. Combining three-dimensional design principles (balance, texture, form, and space) with scientific concepts (mechanical, gravitational, electrical, and magnetic energies), students created diagrams and step-by-step instructions for their sculptures. The residency culminated in building automata, handmade toys powered by a simple mechanism. Student artists confronted their essential question—“What moves us?”—on a more personal level when they utilized both their artistic and scientific knowledge to develop unique ways to make their sculptures move.

 

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Explore, Exploring, Exploration
PS 42, Manhattan
Grade 4

Teaching Artist
Jen Cecere

Inspired by their social studies curriculum, Age of Exploration, fourth-grade students considered the ways artists explore ideas. Students conducted research on self-directed topics of interest, including outer space, under the sea, and traveling to China. They researched topics in group brainstorms, through reading and writing, and eventually constructed three-dimensional “explorer proxies” which could do things for students, like explore ideas in an imaginary or faraway place. The work also serves as a documentation of student artists’ exploration with media: collage, watercolor, painting, color mixing, drawing, perspective, and positive/negative space. These sculptures are records of artistic discoveries.

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