Residencies

Learning Through Art

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Residencies

2012–13 Learning Through Art Residencies

Listed below are brief overviews of the LTA residencies from the 2012–13 school year.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 88, Queens
3rd Grade
Teaching Artist: Antonia Perez

In conjunction with their English language arts curriculum, third graders at PS 88 considered the question, “What is character?” As students investigated the character traits of people in famous works of art and in their own lives, they expanded their vocabulary by using descriptive language. Students then explored the concept of character by examining their features in a mirror and discussing how their varied expressions represented different emotions. These investigations resulted in self-portrait drawings, collages, and, ultimately, painted collages using acrylic paint.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 88, Queens
5th Grade
Teaching Artist: Susan Mayr

“How is nature a part of my life?” Growing up in New York City, this question is often overlooked, but not for the fifth-grade students at PS 88. Students began by closely investigating their natural environment. During neighborhood walks, students sketched directly from observation, looking closely at trees and birds. As the year continued, students experimented with various materials, including charcoal, aqua pastels, and acrylic paint. For their final works, students painted their personal connections to the natural world.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 28, Manhattan
2nd Grade
Teaching Artist: Ellie Irons

Connecting to the second-grade social studies curriculum, students at PS 28 spent the year analyzing the past, present, and future of their community, Washington Heights. New construction in the local neighborhood inspired the question, “How do changes in our environment change our community?” Students examined this question from many angles, including studying old maps and visiting the historic Morris-Jumel Mansion, as well as painting Washington Heights today. After analyzing these different environments, students worked in groups to create diorama-like imaginary communities filled with people and animals using watercolors, ink, and clay.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 42, Manhattan
5th Grade
Teaching Artist: Jen Cecere

Throughout the year, fifth graders at PS 42 learned about metaphor in literature and poetry. Demonstrating their deep understanding of this literary tool, students created visual symbols representing their personal identity. Using Styrofoam plates, students printed their personal metaphors on fabric, utilizing traditional block-printing techniques as well as watercolor paint. Finally, in groups of four, students used their fabric to create an item of clothing that used their individual metaphors to create new ones.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 9, Brooklyn
4th Grade
Teaching Artist: Emily Gibson

Fourth graders at PS 9 studied examples of 16th-century cabinets of curiosities—elaborate displays of unusual specimens from private collections that are a precursor to today’s museums. This concept informed their art making and exploration of materials. Students investigated the properties of ink by experimenting with reed pens, bamboo brushes, markers, and a traditional Japanese marbleizing technique called suminagashi. Combining their deep understanding of ink and how to organize a collection, students created mixed-media works highlighting an assortment of significant details from moments in their lives.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 9, Brooklyn
3rd Grade
Teaching Artist: James Reynolds

Inspired by the Guggenheim exhibition Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms, which included a collection of found objects, third graders at PS 9 thought about sustainability and the stories objects tell about people, culture, and time. This conceptual project asked students to think deeply about the personal significance that “stuff” has in their lives and how the juxtaposition of these objects can create new meaning. Working in groups of two, students critiqued each other’s work, offering feedback and suggestions. The sculptures on view were built from found, recycled, and repurposed materials.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 144, Queens
3rd Grade
Teaching Artist: Molly O’Brien

Students at PS 144 designed “inventions” using the scientific method coupled with experiential, artistic problem-solving to make “student life easier” while maintaining aesthetic conventions of good composition. Integrated with the third-grade science curriculum, students planned their simple machine-inventions through drawings and then sculpture, inspired by exploratory art-making methods. Students translated ideas from two-dimensional to three-dimensional (and vice versa) and experimented with a variety of materials in efforts to understand the importance of process in creating art, as well as the product. Students made predictions about their inventions and evaluated their designs. They questioned how scientists can be artists and artists can be scientists.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 48, Staten Island
3rd Grade
Teaching Artist: Ardina Greco

Students in the third grade researched ways cultures represent themselves visually and created models of “cultural institutions” inspired by the architecture from the countries they studied (China, Italy, Russia, and South Africa). After the models were constructed, students created a visual narrative in paper that captured a moment in these countries’ cultural histories. These three-dimensional amalgamated structures capture visions for cultural institutions, based on design concepts from the Guggenheim in New York and Bilbao, Spain. Through visual narratives that capture character, setting, and elements expressive of plot, the works come to life.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 48, Staten Island
4th Grade
Teaching Artist: Mark Dzula

Students in the fourth grade explored the artistic potential of everyday objects through art making and observation. Individually and collaboratively, students created casts of classroom objects as well as their own bodies, using clear duct tape. Additionally, students were introduced to color mixing and painted the objects in a documentary fashion. Fueled by the question “What potential stories, spoken and unspoken, are told by collections?” students organized their works into groupings, creating multiple interpretations of collections. Inspired by the fall 2012 exhibition at the Guggenheim Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms, students were challenged by the dynamics of Orozco’s display choices and art organization to tell a story of their own.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 151, Queens
2nd and 4th Grades
Teaching Artist: Megan Pahmier

Through a series of experimental, multicolor monoprints, students explored how change happens through natural processes and manmade actions. Students learned how the artists of Gutai activated their art through the use of their bodies, such as throwing paint or punching through paper. Students discovered how their actions (constructive and deconstructive) affect their artwork over time. During the monoprint process, students explored how the actions of sticking, peeling, scratching, stamping, and rubbing affect their print. Through reflection and documentation, students observed and shared their personal and artistic growth.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 151, Queens
3rd Grade
Teaching Artist: Antonia Perez

With a focus on global communication, PS 151 students are regularly engaged in thinking about the world around them. Integrating into this school-wide initiative, third graders considered, “What makes a community?” Students explored the concept of community by discussing what they see in their neighborhood and how people influence their surroundings. For their final project, students collaborated in groups to make wooden constructions inspired by the theme of community. These projects express their understanding that a community is made up of individuals working together to build something greater than themselves.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 151, Queens
4th Grade
Teaching Artist: Kristin Ann Melkin

Connecting to social studies curriculum, fourth graders explored the question, “How am I connected to people in the past?” They began by investigating remnants of colonial history in their Woodside, Queens, neighborhood and studied the early history of New York City. They explored ways to interpret these histories through abstraction, texture, and their senses. They then examined their everyday lives and envisioned how they would want their future selves to remember them. The displayed mixed-media assemblages combine drawing, painting, printmaking, and collage in a way that tells something about the students—a kind of time capsule or letter to themselves in the future.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 8, Brooklyn
3rd Grade
Teaching Artist: Jenny Bevill

Guided by the essential question, “How does where you are shape who you are?” students created a chain of symbols in the form of a visual timeline with representations of moments, ideas, places, and passions which have shaped them. Connecting to the social studies curriculum of communities around the world as well as character studies, students looked inward for small or big moments that helped make them who they are. The final works are muslin squares painted with watercolors, watercolor pencils, and Sharpie markers. Each student created a string of fabric flags to tell the layered story of their lives.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 8, Brooklyn
4th Grade
Teaching Artist: Jenny Bevill

Fourth graders learned about art interventions, street art, and art activism. Each class designed and built their own art installation with the hope of changing people’s perspectives. The final pieces were installed in the school’s classrooms and hallways in Brooklyn Heights and expressed a collaborative response to an issue which each class stands up for. The photographs displayed here are a documentation of the student works in-situ at the school. This process-oriented work helps to answer the question, “How can art change or develop our perspective?”

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 676, Brooklyn
3rd and 4th Grades
Teaching Artist: Jeff Hopkins

While exploring the living world around them in their science curriculum, students created layered collages that symbolically represent how they interact with other living things in the environment. Using handmade and textured paper as the base, the collages include natural elements such as leaves and sticks, prints of objects and patterns found in nature, a self-portrait drawing, and the written word.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 86, Bronx
6th Grade
Teaching Artist: Jeff Hopkins

To explore the concept of change over time, sixth graders worked on a single landscape painting over the course of multiple class sessions. Each week they were given challenges, such as population increases, the introduction of a new resource, or losing a resource due to a natural disaster, that influenced how their landscape might evolve. With each set of instructions, students then adapted their landscape painting to the different circumstances. The final landscape paintings predict what life might be like in the future. Accompanying the paintings is a video which shows how each painting changed during each session.

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Student artwork. Photo: Kristopher McKay

PS 86, Bronx
4th Grade
Teaching Artist: Molly O’Brien

Students explored the idea of character and self, both in their literacy curriculum and in the arts. Discussions focused on character traits and how these can be made evident in a visual work. Ultimately, students thought about the qualities of a role model and selected a person in their life that has served as a role model. They created clay-relief portraits of their role models which express both their internal and external characteristics.