Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative Travels to Hong Kong

Installation view: No Country: Contemporary Art for South and Southeast Asia, Asia Society Hong Kong Center, October 30, 2013–February 16, 2014

No Country: Contemporary Art for South and Southeast Asia is now on view at the Asia Society Hong Kong Center through February 16, 2014. First seen at the Guggenheim Museum earlier this year, No Country is the first touring exhibition of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, a multiyear project exploring contemporary art in three regions: South and Southeast Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East and North Africa. Hong Kong is the initiative’s first international stop, and will be followed by a presentation of No Country in Singapore.

“The Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and our work with the Asia Society Hong Kong Center on this special presentation of No Country: Contemporary Art for South and Southeast Asia build upon our existing Asian Art Initiative and provide local, regional, and global audiences a deeper, more rewarding, and we hope, more nuanced cultural exchange,” said Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation.

“We are pleased to collaborate with the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and UBS in mounting No Country: Contemporary Art for South and Southeast Asia at the Asia Society Hong Kong Center,” said S. Alice Mong, Executive Director, Asia Society Hong Kong Center. “We share the vision of furthering the understanding of countries through arts and cultural exchange, and engaging Hong Kong and global audiences in our commitment.”

In its Hong Kong iteration, the exhibition, organized by June Yap, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, South and Southeast Asia, and Dominique Chan, Exhibition Curator, Asia Society Hong Kong Center, places added emphasis on the role of South and Southeast Asian faiths, religions, and moral codes in shaping the region’s communities. Through a diverse range of artistic practices, the artists featured in No Country reflect on the manifestations and effects of belief. Artworks including Shilpa Gupta’s sculpture 1:14.9 (2011–12) and Norberto Roldan’s painting F-16 (2012) reflect on the impact of religion on the birth of nation-states, while other works such as Tuan Andrew Nguyen’s sculpture Enemy’s Enemy: Monument to a Monument (2012) meditate on the interplay between present-day global society and religious heritage.

Visit the initiative’s website for information on public events—including a daylong program exploring rice as agriculture, cuisine, and material, and a series of artist-led, exhibition-related programs with Tang Da Wu, Khadim Ali, and Tayeba Begum Lipi. Also accessible online now, and subject to expansion in the coming months, is a new section containing detailed information on each No Country artist, accompanied by behind-the-scenes photos, video interviews, and more.

Installation view: No Country: Contemporary Art for South and Southeast Asia, Asia Society Hong Kong Center, October 30, 2013–February 16, 2014. Courtesy of Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and Asia Society Hong Kong Center. Photo: Jessica Hromas

Marxz Rosado, The Process for Attaining the Signature of Pedro Albizu Campos in Neon Lights (Proceso para conseguir la firma de Pedro Albizu Campos en luces de neón), 1977–2002

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